Cat Purr Benifits


People find it interesting: that ability of a cat to sympathetically help cure illnesses in people simply by being around them. Studies have also shown that owners, especially senior citizens, who have cats have lower blood pressure and can live longer than humans who don't own pets.

The warmth of their furry bodies and open, purring friendship can drastically influence a person’s state of mind for the better. Vital signs taken after an individual’s interaction with a pet show positive effects on the blood pressure, pulse, and breathing frequency, and the results of these tests are surprisingly similar to the body’s condition after deep meditation. Some studies have even indicated that having pets reduces stress and results in a lowered risk of heart disease.

Many individuals swear they can ease or completely eliminate their migraine headaches simply by lying down with a purring cat next to their head. Can't hit that minimum recommended daily dose of bone-enriching calcium? Maybe grabbing the nearest cat and holding it close may just prove to be the answer to brittle-bones. Having surgery? Perhaps after coming home, keeping a cat nearby will reduce your recovery time. So, go get a cat. Keep it happy and purring. You're both likely to be healthier and you'll have a great friend who truly understands how you're feeling.

Doctors and scientists in a number of different medical fields are researching the healing properties of sound, and the results are pretty promising. Most body cavities and tissues have their own resonant frequencies, and sound in those ranges can stimulate the respective organs to heal. For example: the human lungs resonate at around 39 hertz (in a fluid medium) and researchers found sound at that frequency to be beneficial to people with lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis.



Vibrational stimulation not only relieves suffering in 82% of persons suffering from acute and chronic pain but also generates new tissue growth, augments wound tissue strength, improves local circulation and oxygenation, reduces swelling and/or inhibits bacterial growth?

Lowered stress and increased calmness could be the cause, but studies over the last twenty years have also shown that people who own pets are much healthier than their non-pet owning counterparts; they are often less-prone to minor illnesses like colds and influenza, score better on psychological tests, and claim to feel a greater sense of well-being.
Adults are not the only ones who benefit from caring for a cat. Children who have participated in the raising of a pet have shown higher self esteem levels, better social skills, and a greater sense of responsibility toward others. For young children and infants, exposure to cats at a young age can also help the child develop resistance to allergens and asthma.

A new study suggests cat owners are less likely to die of a heart attack or stroke than people who, well, don't own cats. Researchers, found that feline-less people were 30 to 40 percent more likely to die of cardiovascular disease than those with cats.